Research has found that it may take 117 years for women to receive equal pay

Women’s employment solicitor, Jodie Hill, is urging women to confront employers about their pay compared to their male counterparts following the public outcry after the leak of BBC’s highest paid staff being predominantly male.

The 10th November is known as national Equal Pay Day as it officially marks the day where the majority of women the in the UK technically work for free until the end of the year. This is due to the fact women currently earn 81p to every £1 that men earn.

In a report produced by The World Economic Forum last year, it was predicted that the issue will not be fixed for another 117 years which suggests that the inequality between men and women’s pay is still as much an issue now as it was when the Equal Pay Act was implemented 47 years ago.

“An online survey which analyses companies payrolls to deliver a gender pay gap report, found that companies that have a narrower gender pay gap actually outperform other companies in the same sector as them.”

Jodie Hill advised women to speak to their employers if they are in doubt about their pay. She said, “Women should not be shy to question their employers if they believe there is a disparity. Men usually don’t have any trouble raising these issues and over time this only widens the gap.

“Employees are entitled to know how their pay is made up. If they are not sure then ask – in writing – so that you have a paper trail of the request should you need to refer to the refusal to provide any information at a later date.

In 2010, the UK implemented a law stating that companies who employ more than 250 people must publish data about their gender pay gap. Many argue we need transparency across all businesses, not just those with more than 250 employees, to truly see the issues behind women’s pay in the UK.

“This [The Equality Act 2010] doesn’t stop employers paying men more than women which is evident in many cases as we are seeing the Gender Pay Gap data being published,” said Jodie. “In order to achieve equality, women have no option but to raise this formally with their employer. If this doesn’t work then they have to face protracted and often very expensive litigation to achieve equality in respect of their pay.”

 

Business woman, Lucy Locket, is a personal trainer and activewear brand owner of Lucy Locket Loves. The self employed 27-year-old explained how the gender pay gap ‘infuriates’ her: “It’s really simple – if you do the same job as somebody else you should be paid equally regardless of their gender. It is sad to think some women may choose a completely different career path because they know that opportunities aren’t open to them as much as they are to men.

“Somebody may choose a completely different career path because they knew opportunities aren’t open to them in certain lines of work or are sure they won’t earn as much as male colleagues.”

Gapsquare, an online survey which analyses companies payrolls to deliver a gender pay gap report, found that companies that have a narrower gender pay gap actually outperform other companies in the same sector as them – this shows that not only will women benefit from similar pay to their male counterparts, but so will the companies they work for.

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